Burratina – History

Burrata (Burratina for the small one) is a typical product of Murgia in the south of Italy.
It is produced from cow’s milk, rennet, and cream. Burrata was probably first made around 1920, but may have origins dating back to about 1900 on the Bianchini farm in the city of Andria within Murgia, an area in the Apulian region. In the 1950s, it became more widely available after some local cheese factories began producing it and it can be a useful way of using up the ritagli (“scraps” or “rags”) of mozzarella.

Established as an artisanal cheese, burrata maintained its premium-product status even after it began to be made commercially in factories throughout Apulia.

Burrata is also produced in the United States, particularly in artisanal cheese shops in cities on the East Coast with historically large populations of Italian Americans.

 

Serving indications

When the burrata is sliced open, a spurt of thickened cream flows out. The cheese has a rich, buttery flavor and retains its fresh milkiness. It is best when eaten within 24 hours and is considered past its prime after 48 hours. The flavor and different textures of the inside and outside make it go well with salad, prosciutto crudo, crusty bread, fresh tomatoes with olive oil, cracked black pepper, or pasta.

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